Occupier Resources for New York State Businesses

While the long-term effects on the workplace are still unknown, we do know that short-term changes are necessary for a safe return to the office. New York State guidelines and recommendations for office-based employers are highly detailed with an emphasis on PPE, social distancing and elevated cleaning practices. Recommendations for furniture configuration and use are highlighted, such as rearranging workstations to limit face-to-face contact and restricting use of cloth covered seating that is harder to clean. A critical component to all of this is a communication plan, so the state is mandating that employers post signage, provide training and set up a system to keep employees up to date.

With New York City's phase one opening date of June 8, we are monitoring requirements and developing solutions for businesses to stay compliant and to provide a safe and welcoming office for their workforce. Our Readiness Resources for Occupiers guide includes information on PPE and cleaning materials, local programs for indoor air quality evaluation and safety partitions for workstations.

Readiness Resources for Occupiers

Download the guide and contact your New York Advisor for more information.

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